Want to leave teaching: what else can I do?

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Want to leave teaching: what else can I do?

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    Title says it all. I'm no good and I've known that for a while. I'm not cut out for it, I can't control behaviour and can't seem to create outstanding lessons. I'm stressed and have been in hospital. I've been teaching 15 years and want a term time job so I can spend time with my kids, but know that I can't have my cake and eat it. So, what to do? Any advice people?
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     Sorry Lozcat I have very little advice so just to say I feel the same. 

    I am not an outstanding teacher either. I've got subject knowledge and love my subject but that doesn't seem to wash anymore.

    I want a new career but no one seems to want teachers or at least at the same pay!

     Sigh.

     

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    me too.

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    Right then. None of us are stupid as we're teachers. We've got skills and gumption, it's just that teaching institutionalises you a bit. We're lacking imagination. Let's not sit here and bemoan our fate; I might get kicked out by summer (even though aspects of my work are outstanding it is one class that is going to give me the push). I will try and do private tutoring for money, although as that us after school and at weekends I will not see my children, who are little, but that will get me money in the meantime. Then, I'll have time to go and find out about jobs elsewhere, in the real world. I don't think the independent sector will suit me as behaviour is not guaranteed to be better and no one will want to upset the fee paying parents. Plus, you have to give so much of your time to extra curricular. I will go to the job centre and see what they have got and go to interviews with jobs I think I could do. What's the worst that can happen? I won't get the job. But then again, I might. So I can't get 29 London kids to work in silence and I haven't got them intuitively becoming the experts in the room. That doesn't make me a failure, it makes me someone who can't get 29 London kids to work in silence. I think that most people actually can't do that either and teachers are special people. I'm just not a teacher anymore. I think I have burnt out. 15 years of City teenagers would do that to lots of people. 15 years of dealing with large groups of grumpy teenagers will do that to most people. We have got skills and we can turn our considerable brains to something else but while we're running on the hamster wheel we haven't got time to think. So here's some homework: let's spend some time over Easter looking into what we can do and actually do something about our lives. I am going to. We can only try. Let's report back to each other and we can help each other out. What do you say?
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    I think that's a great idea and actually what I was planning to do anyway. Does anyone know other teachers who left teaching? What are they doing? Are there jobs which we are well suited for?
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    I qualified as a secondary school teacher 15 years ago, but after 2 years teaching geography as a wonderful International School in Sri Lanka I decided not to teach when I returned to the UK. Instead I have worked for various organisations in the voluntary sector (such as CSV, VSO and as the manager of a Development Education Centre). I have mainly worked with young people, but also managed education projects such as setting up global school links and developing teacher resources and CPD. Teachers are very well suited to jobs in the voluntary sector and many large international charities now have education departments as they are trying to raise awareness of their work in schools. Unfortunatley, the voluntary sector has been hit hard in recent years and there are distinctly fewer jobs available now than there used to be. Also, there are obvious drawbacks, the pay, the holidays, the pension etc. but benefits can include less stress, more time with family and a sense of satisfaction from doing something you believe in. If you have any questions I'm happy to help. Good luck with the job search.
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    Hi there, I am a Primary teacher who has worked for five years in state schools. I came from Devon to the South-east and despite many positive moments in teaching have decided to give it up. My last school went into Special measures and I became extremely stressed out with monitoring, observations, assessment and constantly trying to be Good/Outstanding....I took some time out and worked as an Education Officer for a water company and then returned recently to a temporary post in a London school. I was observed as a good teacher but got sick of the awful behaviour and in some classes and realised i had just grown sick of the system- targets, OFSTED, book scrutinies. The pressure and stress was too much for me...tired of poor behaviour and jumping through hoops. Teaching in inner cities schools is mostly a thankless task in my experience- I have concluded that I simply do not have that level of passion and would be better suited to something less stressful. You get one chance in life and if something isn't right and you know you have worked hard to improve it then get out. No point in spending your life moaning........ I am moving back to Devon, looking for a less stressful job and hoping that life down there will be kinder and less brutal than London. Below poster is correct, there are jobs in voluntary organisations and I do believe that skills learnt in education are very transferable as long as you sell yourself in the right way. Teaching is a challenging profession- 10% excel and thrive, 80% cope, get stressed and sick and moan and 10% do the sensible thing and leave. Actually, think more than 10% leave in first five years. Best of luck!!!!
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    This post has sparked an interesting debate. There used to be a group called ‘the staffroom escape club' formed by teachers in your position. There is nothing wrong in realising you have made a mistake, as I have mentioned in the past my career contains at least two wrong turns. The first thing to do is assess the skills you do possess and when the type of work you both like and are prepared to do. Measure this against the minimum income requirement and the local labour market. If you are in London and the south East there will be more opportunities than in say rural East Anglia. Can you start your own business bolstered by some tutoring and the odd day of supply if you can get it and are prepared to go back into schools? Can you retrain for another career in a people centred job? If your period in hospital is directly related to teaching can you claim that you have been left unfit for teaching? Although a disability pension is almost impossible to obtain, there are those who do manage it and although you cannot work during periods of sick leave, you can use the time productively to consider your options for the future. However, how will another employer view time out due to stress, especially in the current job market? The Teacher Support Line 08000 562 561 www.teachersupport.info may be able to offer you some advice on a one to one basis and you should certainly consult with them.

    John Howson

     

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     I was teaching in the classroom for 12 years - I had a couple of 'near breaks' in terms of trying to get out - but I allowed myself to be dragged back each time. Why? Same reasons as given above - what else can I do?

    I HATED most of it - had a lovely couple of schools - but on maternity contracts - I spent 5 years in one inner city which had me ill.

    SO.... I have left FOR GOOD!

    I am building on my tutoring work - my subjects are fortunately in demand and I earn as much as I was on the silly supply teachers wage of £100 a day! And that was hit and miss to say the least!

    I am applying for permanent jobs - temporary jobs - anything I can - just to get money.

    Am I content? No - am I happy to have left teaching - oh absolutely! What I was doing daily was not teaching - not what I trained for any longer and I couldn't do it.

    Keep faith everyone - and yes lets all give feedback and advice as to what we do ....after

     

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    Well, I haven't done any research into jobs so far as one child had birthday plus illness plus party coming up and then there's their horse riding, karate, play dates and haven't even kept up with washing and ironing. Do a fair but of changing beds in the night though. Well, I could be a care assistant in a nursing home.
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    Hi sounds great really am fed up of job and wanting some guidance as you say we have loads of skills that I feel are transferable. How did you go about it? Thanks for any advice
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    I'm in a similar place, I'm an NQT, I haven't finished my induction year yet but I am starting to think about leaving teaching. I've been diagnosed with depression and although I've had it for many years, it has been made significantly worse by the job and I've decided that it's just not worth it!

    I looked at this: http://www.ncl.ac.uk/careers/assets/documents/Alternativestoteaching.pdf/

    It's a document about alternatives to teaching. From looking at this, I've decided on persuing the idea of becoming a lab technician.

    Read it and see what catched your eye, I'm sure there's something in there for all of us!

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    How sad is this??? I have been teaching in a secondary school for 20 yrs and used to be held up as an exemplar of good practice to others. However during the last few yrs things have gone from bad to worse. I also can't get the outstanding, and all to often even good lesson. Am now being mentored by wee ones only a yr or two into the job. Like yourself feel humiliated and desperate to move on. But also want a job that fits in around the kids but pays as well as teaching. Let me know how you do.

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    Loz Cat what an awesome reply. With get up and go like that you'll be on your feet in no time. What is sad is that your current school don't see what a catch you are. I 100% support your comments about feeling burnt out. I have spent easter doing lots of research- hence am on this forum as part of finding out what other like minded people are doing. I'm looking at a)  trying to get into Primary school teching and seeing if that is different b) doing supply teaching and see if the culture in other schools is different to my current one.

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    Its not that you are no good its that teaching has become highly politicalised not only by the polititians but also by Middle leaders and SLT who are on the make and want to be seen clamping down on 'poor' T&L as it looks good on their CV's

    Saying that teaching is a tough job and to someone who pointed out that we get long holidaays I would point out that I paid for mine by the amount of UNPAID overtime I did during term time. Marking and assessment and feedback to the required standard cannot be done in 5 mins for a class of 30. Parents evenings, out of school trips Lesson planning. Work it out.

    I have finally done what I have been saying I would for 3 years - I left a fairly horrible school with SLT, who did not teach, more concerned about how the results would affect their careers and consequently bore down on the defencless teachers who were actually producing these results. I am looking for a new role perhaps in teaching perhaps not. Supply work is terrible I went into a school where 5 qualified teachers were being used as Cover supervisors at £60- £80 per day.  The message to me was DO NOT DO SUPPLY work.   Even so I am happy to be out of that school.

    Anyway enough of the rant - Teaching prepares you for a host of other jobs some well paid some not so it depends what is important to you. Money, less stress, a new challenge.

    anyway look at these websites for ideas.

    A Kaleidoscope Of Alternative Career Choices For Teachers  

    http://www.tefl.net/esl-jobs/transferable-skills-teachers.htm

     Good luck

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    God, This is me exactly!! Please help someone. Job is now making me ill.

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    I haven't even qualified yet and have decided I cannot cope being a teacher :(. In my final 4th year placement and just got put at risk because my lesson was not 'wow' enough....never mind the fact that the children were all engaged, all learnt what they were meant to and stayed on task throughout the lesson.

    I cannot quit the course as my parents would be annoyed at loosing £12,000.

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    This thread for me sums up why good teachers feel so inadequate in the current world of education. My Aunt is a member of SLT in a primary school and she has recently considered leaving the job due to the poor treatment of a colleague. He has been teaching for 15 years and has constantly been awarded 'good' and 'outstanding'. My aunt said he is one of the best and most experienced teachers in the entire school. He recently was graded 'unsatisfactory' with a very difficult class and, despite the fact that his results are excellent and his track record is fabulous, he was pressured so much by SLT and the new headteacher that he only mangaged another 'unsatisfactory' when he was re-observed. He has now gone off with stress. Ridiculous. My Aunt tried to stick up for him but the system is silly. Why should excellent teachers have to go through this? Perhaps in 10 years time the teaching profession will be full of jazzy lessons filled with juggling, dancing lions, musical ipads and finger painting but we'll all be left wondering why results and the British economy are in the toilet.

    No wonder so many of us have considered different career paths!

    Anyway, rant over! Good luck with the job hunting everyone and thanks for some enlightening ideas.

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    I'm an NQT and when I finished my PGCE I decided that I did not want to be a classroom teacher in a mainstream school. This is purely because I feel that the stress would outweigh the benefits for me. I am still passionate about education and I'm glad I did my PGCE though. Tomorrow I am starting my new job as an Education Officer for a local authority, I will be working with schools and others in the community trying to promote use of a large park. I will let you know how I get on if anyone is interested in going down a similar route.
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    This thread has made really interesting reading.  I have been a primary school teacher for only a couple of years but I just don't think I can carry on.  I can't cope with the constant stress, observations and pressure.  I have suffered wih anxiety and depression and I just have no life.  Life is short and I want to be happy and start actually living my life.  The problem is not only do I not know what I want to do but it seems like most jobs would involve taking a drop in salary and although at this point being happy is more important I live alone and need to cover my bills so just can't afford to take much of a wage cut.  Feel trapped really.  It's good to know that i'm not alone in feeling like this, good luck to everyone and any advice would be most welcome,

    x

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