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Guided Reading in Reception...Please Please help!!

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     Hi I really hope somebody can help me (again!). To cut a verylong story short I have only just started doing Guided Reading in Reception, and I am being observed on Thursday by both my Literacy subject leader (who also happens to be deputy head), and our CLLD advisor. I have carried out a few guided reading sessions this last week or so in order to be ready for the observation, but today it really hit me that I don't know how to do guided reading in Reception. I thought I did but I didn't. I am in my 2nd year of teaching, and during my training I saw guided reading in year 1, and I carried out guided reading in year 2, but never saw it in reception. I thought I should be getting the children in the group to take turns reading say, a page, and talk about the pictures and things to practise their comprehension skills, but my colleague in the opposite class just asks her children to find and point to certain words that she knows they ought to be able to read/decode. It's really important for my school that this observation goes well, and if anyone can help me or give me any advice I would be so appreiciative!!!! I plan on working with my top group, 2 of whom are currently on brown reading level for individual reading (Cliff Moon levels), and 2 are on pink but will be moving onto brown very soon (so I thought I should use brown level guided reading books). I was also thinking of looking at a non-fiction book as this probably has a lot of scope. Thanks in advance to anyone who can help!!!!!

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    I was recently observed by our CLLD advisor, she said everything was ok but she would have let the chn readthe book  independently rather than taking it in turns. In other words, read at own pace and as the teacher just listen to each child seperatley.

    I did a book walk first (im not sure what level brown are as we use lighthouse books). talked about front cover how many words in title and asked them all to read the title etc.

    With  lighthouse books, you are actually given a follow up activity so its fairly easy to plan.

    This probably hasnt been any use, but good luck.

    samantha

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    I don't know if this is helpful but our school have suggestions for guided reading which we are meant to follow at an age-appropriate level. In my Reception class I am expected to provide a mixture of phonic, speaking and listening, fine-motor, reading and handwriting activities. I assign tables to my groups (this is the only time of the day when they have to go to a certain table/area) and we do guided reading for about 15 mins every morning. So.. ...I work with a group on the carpet letting them read a book (one copy each) and moving round to hear each one and have a quick chat with each one about it. The other groups might be using puppets/small world, doing a writing activity (they love the sparklebox word mats and making little books), doing a fine motor activity such as using peg boards or hammer and nails. playdough etc, or completing a phonic activity. I always start guided reading with whole class recap of sounds, either flash cards or modelled on board for writing. When we come back to the carpet we recap tricky words on flash cards.

    Hope this helps! Although I have absolutely no idea if it's right or not!!!

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    There was a DFES (or whatever they are called these days) DVD issued about a year ago to do with guided reading in the early years. In all the groups they were letting the children read independently while the reacher floated round the group. They had lots of up front activities like flashcards with words on and follow up activities, some of which were more like a lesson in themselves. It is probably in your school somewhere if you ask around.
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    I observed a reception guided reading of a phonic book and this was a rough plan

    -revise letter sounds that were needed for the group and the book that was being read - the group were starting to read oo and ee sounds etc at the time.

     

    -revised how to blend words with oo and ee sounds in them

    -Look at book cover and discuss the title

    -read at own pace but one page at a time

    -then discussed picture and what was happening in the story

     

    also spent time looking at revised sounds (eg oo and ee) when they came up in book

    -finally talked about the whole of the story

     

    i hope this is of some help.

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     Thank you everyone for your help. I am feeling clearer now about what to do for my observation, and I will obviously get feedback to help me improve afterwards as well. Thank you again!!

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    Hello

     

    I am interested in what you did in the end and how it went if you don't mind sharing!

    I currently have children reading aloud, one page each and am wondering whether it is better to let them all read each page independently instead.

     

    thanks

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     Hi,

     

    That is how I was doing it originally (and based on the annotations I saw on my Literacy Leader's observations how she expected it to be done), but based on the info from the helpful posts above, and also a fab e-mail from a CLLD lead teacher, I shared the learning intention, then did a walkthrough of the book all together, pointing out words and diagraphs etc that we have been looking and looked at a couple of significant pictures, then got them to read it at their own pace independently, and I went round and listened to them each reading a bit. I finished off by showing flashcards with those words on. The CLLD advisor who was also observing said the structure was fine (but did feel that I should have used a more challenging book). I hope this helps but let me know if not and I will try to be clearer or send you my lesson plan that I wrote.

     

    Thank you again to everyone who helped, the observation went well in the end and the CLLD advisor left much happier than after the last visit, which also means happy senior management. I appreciate all the advice I received!

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    Thanks -that helps !

    What was your learning intention ?

    Smile

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     My learning intention was 'to read a range of familiar and common words and simple sentences independently'. It was with my top group of readers (except for one who has a reading age of a 7 year old!).

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    • Sorry if this is a daft question, but how do you interpret a 'walkthrough' of a book? Do you mean looking at the title and predicting what it might be about and then looking through the pictures to find out what is happening OR do you mean going through and reading it whilst they follow the words with their fingers?

    Thank you and apologies again is this seems obvious!

     

     

     

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    The advice I received was to look at the front cover and discuss, and go through the book looking at the pictures, or finding Hf words/Words with the phoneme/grapheme that you are focussing on. Then go back to the beginning, read the title, and get the children to start reading through independently whilst you go round and listen to each one. Mind you I am finding this easier said than done, went ok for the observation thank goodness but having problems since. Gotta find a way to boos tthe children's confidence to have a go at reading it themselves, and also to make them realise that I do actually know if they've just flicked through the pages and not actually read it!

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    should we be doing group 'guided reading" in reception? would it be better to do whole class book skills e.g book terminology,front cover, title, words, pictures etc.then follow this up by listening to/ discussing with individual children? 5 children could be listened to each day.specific skills could be tailor made to suit the individual.
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     My top priority during guided reading and any other form of reading is the comprehension. We are often obsessed by word decoding, which is one important skill indeed, but many early readers have great decoding skills and we give for granted that they understand the text. I normally use a picture book first, with all groups and I expect the children to understand the story looking at the details of the illustrations: are people smiling? is there anything missing on the table? Why do you think that character is not happy? Let us not forget that lots of Reception children can't talk properly, at least in my school, therefore guided reading becomes a speaking and listening session based on comprehension and pre-reading skills such as looking at details, so that once their eyes are trained, it will be easier for them to recognise ON from NO, WAS from SAW, P from q, etc. We need to develop their reading skill slowly and create the real foundations. 

    Obviously all this accompanied by a regular phonics appraoch.

     

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