Forums

Avatar

TES Mathematics - Forum

Join hundreds of maths teachers in the TES Maths group. Find lesson ideas and inspiration, share best practice and get your questions answered by your peers. This is also the place to go to debate the latest issues in maths teaching.

Members 4993 Total Posts 48760

Children in Need and number work

  • post reply
    It's been decided to mix up all yr groups on Friday and for each teacher to provide a different experience. So....what do I do with approx 30 R-6 children that includes alot of numberwork?
    Posted
    Please Log in or Join this group to replyReply
  • post reply
    What kind of things are you interested in? What kind of things are that age of pupil interested in? Is there any area of maths identified as generally a weak area for your intake?
    Posted
    Please Log in or Join this group to replyReply
  • post reply
    Age range is 4-11 in each group!! Activity to be repeated four times during the course of the day so approx 1hr for each group. The nearest I've got to some datahandling as the 4yr olds can be very practical - use of unifix etc for counting up - and the older children can be more paper based.
    Posted
    Please Log in or Join this group to replyReply
  • post reply
    nshreids
    Age range is 4-11 in each group!!

    Apart from wondering why this is better than having groups that are slightly closer in age ... here is a possibility:

    Does one of the parts of the Children in Need branding still involve spots? If so then there could be a bunch of activities based around spots and dots.

    For the smallest pupils there could be dots to put in groups. They could pile them up in equal size groups and find out which numbers are odd (the piles don't match) and which are even.

    Slightly older pupils could discover which numbers of dots can make a rectangle that is at least 2 dots wide and long and which numbers can only be used to make a line (primes). [Circular stickers would be good for this.].

    For the oldest pupils you could scatter glitter or sand on a glue-covered piece of paper and get something that is a page of random(-ish) dots. If you photocopy this and give it to the pupils the question could then be: "how many dots are there on the page?". Rather than counting every dot hey could divide the page up into squares, count a few of the squares and multiply up.

    Near the end of the lesson the pupils could explain what they did to the other groups. Any use?

    Posted
    Please Log in or Join this group to replyReply
  • post reply
    Thanks - I was beginning to think along the same lines. I had a CinN spotty teatowel which I  am going to p'copy and have differentiated activities based on the number of spots. Am extendingit to data handling so loads of different graphs which I know all of KS2 have done and I will sit myself with the KS1 children. Like the rectangle idea. Alos thinking of scaling up/down a picture of Pudsey - though I know this has nothing to do with number!
    Posted
    Please Log in or Join this group to replyReply