examples of musical textures - modern day songs

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examples of musical textures - modern day songs

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    Hi, I am preparing a lesson on textures (polyphonic, monophonic, homophonic, hetrephonic) for a KS3 group and have classical musical examples of textures but would really like some more modern day/rock/pop examples to show them............ Anyone done this/ have any good examples please? Thanks!
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    Given that the vast majority of pop music has a homophonic texture, I think you may be hard pressed to find find a range of examples of any length.
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    Just googled 'polyphonic pop' and this one came up.

    http://www.menc.org/forums/viewtopic.php?id=5767

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    You will have to dig about a bit, but there is a music DVD series called "Music is.........." It was made in the late 70ties early 80ties, but the the one you want is " Music is Style". The presenter was one conductor called Murray Sidlin. It is an amazing analysis of how to quite accurately describe the Styles from Baroque to 20th Century. My copy is worn to death. It's dated, but does the biz!! Good luck!
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    tanbur

    Just googled 'polyphonic pop' and this one came up.

    http://www.menc.org/forums/viewtopic.php?id=5767



    The trouble is that some of the pieces mentioned there are hardly pop (unless you regard The Pirates of Penzance as pop), and in those that are, the texture is more often dialogue than true polyphony.

    Personally, I wouldn't bother with trying to find pop equivalents for classical elements such as variations in texture. Rather like dynamic variety, it's often more noticeable by its absence than its presence in pop music.

    My own line was always "here are 20 ways in which classical music is more interesting than pop music" rather than suggesting that we old fogies are hooked on some kind of out-of-date pop music.

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    'Will I' from Rent the musical is a more modern example of a canon and there is plenty of contrapuntal/polyphonic work in musical theatre.

    'All for the best' from Godspell,

    'One' - finale from A Chorus line,

    'Finale B' from Rent starts as homophonic and moves into polyphony,

    Opening number of Godspell - Tower of Babel - goes into about 8 parts near the end.

    'Skid Row' from Little Shop of Horrors - the last half

    There are absolutely loads, you'll have more luck in that genre than in pop (although i'll have a think later about some from there unless someone else beats me to it with a list on here). Rent is pretty funky in places, it won't sound as dated as Godspell, i've used it before to demonstrate textures to my students.
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    I realise I may be lining myself up to be shot down here but there MUST be some examples from the 'Glee' repertoire. There were so many 'mash-ups' done for those shows that there must be the layers. I will ask my daughter who is a fan. I'd like to put in a disclaimer that neither am I a fan, not am I promoting said repertoire, merely citing examples :)
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    As I thought.............

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PisP9FW79Bc

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3NyEf_xfGuM

    Apologies to all music lovers out there.
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    If songs from musicals aren't too 'classical' (!) for your students, you could listen to:

    'I Still Believe' from Miss Saigon. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XRphr4qVJLQ (about 3'12'').

    'Will I Lose My Dignity' from Rent.

    'Fugue for Tinhorns' from Guys and Dolls.

    'Quartet' from Chess.

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    Also it is worth considering using film music. Although it is not "pop" the kids will recognise it and lots of examples to choose from.

    I've just been using Phantom Menace - Dual Of The Fates for polyphonic texture for our year 9s, they loved it!

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    Although I agree with FG above, Queen were quite clever at creating close canonic imitation using timed delay. The Prophet's Song at about 3:24 is a good example. As is the famous guitar solo in the live version of Brighton Rock from about 2:18. I imagine pretentious prog people like ELP and Yes did some counterpoint, too.

    But this is as anachronous to today's kids as if someone were to have played me Glenn Miller when I was at school. Maybe not so "cool" after all...

    Personally, I think banging out London's Burning or some sort of Fugue gets the message across just as well.

    useful link though I think the monophony diagram is misleading: GCSE guys sometimes think that, say, a clarinet line doubled at the 8ve by fiddles is something other than monophonic. I think this arises in an Edexcel specimen paper question about "Peripetie", so the board obviously wants them to clock that a line in parallel 8ves is monophonic.

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    Marcia Blaine
    though I think the monophony diagram is misleading

     

    I also think that Bach's sonatas for violin and cello suites are singularly bad examples of "monophony", for obvious reasons.

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