Which subject has the worst behaviour?

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Which subject has the worst behaviour?

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    Which subject do you feel has the worst behaviour and why? Do you feel there is a subject where pupils are generally well behaved? For me, it must be MFL.
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    Good behaviour must surely link with pupil engagement, so I am not sure that there is any one subject that fits all pupils and thus their behaviour.

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    Woah, stand away from the MFL!!!  I'm an MFL teacher. My classrooms are a picture of perfection, I'll have you know!  Tongue out

    Forget the subject. It's not about the subject.

    It's about a teacher who can't inspire / control / manage / whatever you choose to call it.

    I am SLT. I go into any number of classrooms and I can guarantee before I start my ... what's it called... ah yes - 'learning walk' - which classrooms will be less 'well behaved' than others.

    In our school it's practically none.  Because we have effective staff now. Didnt' used to be like that, mind, and that was down to poor teaching and passive children.

    I honestly don't think it's subject specific. If kids like a teacher and see progress in their lessons, they're less likely to play up.

    IMHO, natch.

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    pinski1971

    It's about a teacher who can't inspire / control / manage / whatever you choose to call it.

    ...and also it has a bit to do with a management team that support the teacher.

    I no longer teach - but when I did, I worked in one place where the classroom teacher basically had no effective sanctions to use. You were not permitted to send a pupil out of your class. After the class you could make a report to management, and the most you ever got was a written apology from the pupil...'Dear Ms bethannie, I am very sorry for swearing at you yesterday. I will try and do better in future, Dwayne' ...and the school had a 'policy' of never excluding any pupil.

    On the other hand, I worked with senior management who gave full support to the staff and made sure every pupil understood this! As a result, behaviour in every classroom was improved.

    In later years I worked with school disaffected pupils at a Training Provider. Again. the key to effective behaviour management was a school-wide or centre-wide policy that was adhered to by all staff from the receptionist through to the head.

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    It also depends on how you measure it.

    If a subject has a high level of detentions / time-outs / whatever, this does not mean that behaviour is poor - it means that they stick to the rules and enjoy the good behaviour as a result.

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    Are you sure you are not making the classic error of linking noise to bad behaviour? For example, if the pupils are working in groups and quite noisy due to everyone being alive and part of the discussion - is that bad behaviour? Likewise, if a class are silent but falling asleep or daydreaming for the bell to ring as the teacher yaks away about him or herself, is that good behaviour? As others have said, I don't think there is a subject as such which promotes bad behaviour. Teachers can help through inspiration but the most talented and alternative thinking teachers were long thrown out or rather frozen out of the profession, and with ridiculous 'singing and dancing with bells on' demands for each and every lesson from Ofsted and the like, quite impossible for most teachers today to cope.
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    As a primary teacher who teaches all subjects, I would say it's usually PE. This is because the class are in a larger space and some simply don't want to join in and others see it as an opportunity to let off steam by going a little crazy. Many definitely don't seem to consider it a proper lesson - a little like art as they get older. They think that if they're not 'good' at it then they don't need to try (and in the case of PE, particularly with boys, if they are good at it they can bully their classmates who are not).
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     RE.

    being forced to learn lies *** most kids off.

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    lurk_much

     RE.

    being forced to learn lies *** most kids off.

    It's no longer about ramming Christianity down kids' throats! Nowadays, what used to be called RE covers a huge swathe of various religions, belief systems, morality and ethics... It's a great subject.

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    Sounds like progress. 

    My experience was of an hour of barely controlled riot (with some colouring in) every week.

     

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    I am an RE teacher in a 'bog standard' comp. I teach philosophy&ethics gcse to every student in the school. Student voice surveys show students like&value the subject&we certainly have no more behavior concerns than other compulsory subjects.
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