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Teaching halves to year 1

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    I'm a GTP. I'm doing the first lesson on teaching halves to year 1. Making it hands on, lots of folding shapes for the LAPs, putting two halves together to make a whole etc.

    Next week I'm being observsed by my Teacher Mentor and Visiting Tutor. WIll be looking at halving quantities. Observation or not I want to make it fun, hands on, and differentiate the work for the three ability groups, but can only think ofdifferentiating by the quantities involved.

     Should I give the LAP physical quantities to half, such as cubes, and keep recording to a minimum. Then MAPs and HAPs have a worksheet halving quatitites up to 10 or 20.

     Any ideas? I've had good observations so far - but flagging a bit this end of term and a bit short of ideas...Tks

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    I don't know what your worksheets ar ike but here's a couple of ideas I use.

    Can they do it with different units - money, bricks, grams etc? I often find adding a letter - p, g, cm etc. perplexes them at first.

    Put up a recipe - you could have tried it earlier if you have time e.g. to make  a chocolate cake for 10 children you would need

    x eggsx grams of flour (cups if your children are not on halving teens numbers}

    x grams of sugar

    x grams of butter.

    x grams of chocolate

    How much of each ingredient would you need for a cake for half that number of children?

    Investigations like the flag one are also good, but you may have already used this.

    Give them a set of rectangular flags outlines, each divided into quarters.

    Easy - Give them a crayon  and ask them how many different ways they can colour half of each flag so it looks different.

    How many different ways can they do it if you give them 2 crayons ( you may need to remind them that they now have 3 colours -2 crayons and white).

    Good luck

     

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    Use playdough and biscuit cutters, get them to cut a 'biscuit' and then cut it in half - half for father Christmas, half for Rudolph for lower abilities. Take a number card (already sorted so only evens) up to 20, make a tower of cubes that high and then break it in half - if really adventurous they could write it on white boards. More able do a similar activity with counters to support - when I did this I left in a few odd numbers as well and got them to put a ? on their boards to show it didn't divide exactly into half. For the plenary we looked at how it linked to the previous day's lesson on doubles and how half of 6 was 3 and double 3 was 6.

     

    Mine have done this this half term (although playdough biscuits were then 1/2 for you, 1/2 for a friend!). Some struggled with the idea of half of a number. I certainly wouldn't be asking mine to find half quantity of a recipe (but it could be your children are better than mine!).

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    I've just done  week on halves with my year 1. All but 6 needed apparatus to help them find half of an amount.

     

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    Finding half of an amount.....

    Here's something I used to do:

    Children work in pairs

    PowerPoint intro: http://www.ks1resources.co.uk/Numeracy%20colouring%20half.pps 

    worksheets: http://www.ks1resources.co.uk/Numeracy%20halves%20and%20quarters.pdf

    From my website for free : http://www.ks1resources.co.uk/page10.html

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    Thanks guys for you help- any more ideas?

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    I always use food...they soon understand that it is not fair if their partner has more than them so I then introduce half as meaning that an object or number is split into two equal (or fair in some of the children's vocabulary) parts. They then might use playdough, cubes, coins, smarties to find what is half of a number. My HA children usually 'get it' after the intro with food and can find half of a number.
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    Google search "froogby dragon" to find the powerpoint of Frooby the Dragon and the Witch - a story about doubling numbers, and then halving them. Fun, visual, and makes a good point.

    And here is Primary Resources on halving - you may find some of the resources useful:

    http://www.primaryresources.co.uk/maths/mathsC4.htm 

     

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    Something I noticed in your post was that you are keen for LAPs to do the work practically but why just them. In Y1 all of the children need lots of practical maths to really help them to understand a concept.

    I taught halves to Y1 last week and all of the children drew round shapes, cut them out and folded them in half. When we went onto halving quantities I got 2 children to stand at the front and I got a handful of objects (fruit, pencils etc). We looked at sharing the fruit between them fairly and said that each child had half.

    You could then put children in pairs and ask them to take x number of objects from the middle of the table. Can they take half each of these objects?

     

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