Expectations for phonics by end year 1

Avatar

TES Primary - Forum

Join hundreds of primary teachers in the TES Primary group. Find lesson ideas and inspiration, share best practice and get your questions answered by your peers. This is also the place for debate on the latest issues in primary teaching.

Members 25424 Total Posts 189380
  Please enter a number between 1 and 2 2 »

Expectations for phonics by end year 1

  • post reply

     What are national expectations for phonics by the end of year 1?  Is this what the new test will cover?

    What does your school achieve with the majority of pupils by the end of year 1?

    Posted
    Please Log in or Join this group to replyReply
  • post reply
    National expectation is that they will be well on to phase 5 or finished it. The phonics test will assume this.

    My school is slowly waking up to this!

    Posted
    Please Log in or Join this group to replyReply
  • post reply

     Oh NO!  Does it matter what the national expectations are- they are our children?  Expect that they might be able to read a little bit by the time they are six, that they will have a whole source of language expereinces to draw on as they make thier way deciphering the printed world around them.  That this rich vein is not shallow and only governement phonics but is highly personal and idiosyncratic.  Expect them to be happy, talkative, playful, don't expect them to find great satisfaction in ploughing through carefully graded reading schemes like rats on a wheel.  Expect them to be scribbling, spluttering, stuttering into their onw flight of words in thesky of all the books and signs around them.  .........................

    <p>Expect them to be representing life as it throbs throug their veins using the languages at their disposal of play, talk, symbols, lines, pictures, movement, let them take great gulps of life and let it out in great shouts of joy in whatever language blocks they can build.  But don't cut and slice them and compare them to national averages where suddenly half of them will have fallen 'behind' and another half will be 'ahead' and some few will be gifted and talented and some ffew will be SEN.

     <p>Let them (and us) of the hook of the expectations of the country and the soundbite and the statistic. Let's stop comapring and grading and remedying and prescribing medicine that the healthy don't need. 

    <p> Lets hope that they meet the national expectation of having somebody who looks at them and tells them they are doing just fine, they will be grown up one day far away, they can be young now, it isn't all high stakes and precious achievement. That it isn'y about the having and the not, the knowing and the not, there is more to it than meeting the expectations of thers who don't know you. 

    Posted
    Please Log in or Join this group to replyReply
  • post reply

    Couldn't agree more yohanalicante.

    However, my LEA want 100% of Y1 to have completed Phase 5 Disappointed

    Given I have a child who had spent all YR working on the first 5 phoneme/grapheme correspondances and had forgotten them all over the summer holidays I'm not sure that's going to happen...

    Posted
    Please Log in or Join this group to replyReply
  • post reply

     The expectations that accompany Letter & Sounds is that most children will know all phonemes and all the alternative ways of representing them by the end of Y1 (so completed Phase5 ready to begin phase 6 or Support for Spelling in Y2).

    Posted
    Please Log in or Join this group to replyReply
  • post reply

    Yes but I've had children transfer to yr3 of my ks2 class, who have come from an 'outstanding' school who havent finished phases 5

    Posted
    Please Log in or Join this group to replyReply
  • post reply
    We all have children who don't learn as they ought to. The 'expectations' are just that most children ought to know all their sounds by the end of year 1 and be ready to start using them correctly. That does seem reasonable.
    Posted
    Please Log in or Join this group to replyReply
  • post reply

     I really struggle with all the emphasis on phonics. When will people pushing this strand in reading development realise that there is no single way to pronounce words in the English language. We live in a country famous for its multitudes of dialects and accents. The word 'foot' or 'grass' or 'drawer' is NOT promounced in the same way in Glasgow, Newcastle, Leeds, Birmingham, Bristol, Cardiff and London, so why do we try to standardise the way groups of letters are taught to children in the early years. 

    Posted
    Please Log in or Join this group to replyReply
  • post reply
    Because, if we didn't teach phonics, when children want to spell words they don't know they write utter nonsense.

    Grass, etc aren't pronounced the same all over the country, but then the phonics taught will take account of the local pronunciation. Or should do.

    Posted
    Please Log in or Join this group to replyReply
  • post reply

     Phonics is about written language, which is standardised, so isn't effected by accent or dialect and words have the same spelling whether you are in Aberdeen or York.

    Posted
    Please Log in or Join this group to replyReply
  • post reply

    Msz

     Phonics is about written language, which is standardised, so isn't effected by accent or dialect and words have the same spelling whether you are in Aberdeen or York.

     

      effected? surely that should be affected.

     

    And Sorry - but a phoneme is a unit of pronunciation. A grapheme is a unit of written language. Therefore phonics is about the pronunciation of groups of letters which is why there are several ways of saying the letter string ough or making the sound of words such as pair/pear. And close to where I live, fair is pronounces in the same way as fur. And you are telling me spelling isn't affected by the way we speak? Incorrect spelling certainly is. 

    Teaching phonics primarily gives children several choices of a way to spell a word. GHOTI and chips anyone?

    Posted
    Please Log in or Join this group to replyReply
  • post reply

    A phoneme is the smallest unit of sound and phonics is about the relationship between spoken language and written language. However the English orthographical system isn't dependent upon accent or dialect you are confusing phonetics with phonics.

    Posted
    Please Log in or Join this group to replyReply
  • post reply

    LoAsh
    GHOTI and chips anyone?

     

    If you understood phonics you would know that the letters gh at the beginning of a word never represent the phoneme <f> and that the letter "o" only represents <i> after a "w" and that "ti" never represent <sh> at the end of a word  ...

    Posted
    Please Log in or Join this group to replyReply
  • post reply

     Obviously I was taught inagequately when I was back at college and when the National Literacy Strategy was introduced...

    Ghoti... Just an example of how a child might use the phonemes we teach - I doubt anyone has taught years 1 and 2 the exact rules of how and when certain letter strings are put together.

    And in my original post I was not saying we should stop teaching phinics altogether, just that there is an over-emphasis on this method - in some schools to the exclusion of all others and the latest govenment targets are excluding children who would better learn to read and write using other strategies.

    Posted
    Please Log in or Join this group to replyReply
  • post reply

     Perhaps we should re-introduce the ita? That way we would have standardisation between sounds and letters (BTW that's a joke - my nephew suffered under that scheme)

    Posted
    Please Log in or Join this group to replyReply
  • post reply

    Dear God, another Masha!

    Posted
    Please Log in or Join this group to replyReply
  • post reply

    LoAsh
    Ghoti... Just an example of how a child might use the phonemes we teach

     

    No ghoti is a constructed word intended to demonstrate the idiosyncrasies of the English spelling system but as anyone who understands English will tell you (and I include 5 year olds in that) it is totally inconsistent with English pronunciation.

    LoAsh
    I doubt anyone has taught years 1 and 2 the exact rules of how and when certain letter strings are put together.
    No we usually cover that in reception

     

    LoAsh
    And in my original post I was not saying we should stop teaching phinics altogether, just that there is an over-emphasis on this method

    I would suggest that a better idea than testing 6 year olds might be to educate those who are teaching phonics so they know what they are doing.

     

    Posted
    Please Log in or Join this group to replyReply
  • post reply

    LoAsh

    Msz

     Phonics is about written language, which is standardised, so isn't effected by accent or dialect and words have the same spelling whether you are in Aberdeen or York.

     

      effected? surely that should be affected.

     

    And Sorry - but a phoneme is a unit of pronunciation. A grapheme is a unit of written language. Therefore phonics is about the pronunciation of groups of letters which is why there are several ways of saying the letter string ough or making the sound of words such as pair/pear. And close to where I live, fair is pronounces in the same way as fur. And you are telling me spelling isn't affected by the way we speak? Incorrect spelling certainly is. 

    Teaching phonics primarily gives children several choices of a way to spell a word. GHOTI and chips anyone?

     

    But no child would ever attempt to read the word ghoti as fish, or write the word fish as ghoti - whether or not they have been explicitly taught pronunciation rules.  Why do you think that is? 

    Spelling mistakes are often phonetic in nature, but then, phonetic spelling is a recognised phase of writing for a young child.  Some take longer to emerge from it, but it is a stepping stone to learning further rules of spelling later on.

    Posted
    Please Log in or Join this group to replyReply
  • post reply

     I find it interesting that the GPCs in phase 5 of letters and sounds are expected to have been taught by the end of year 1.  Our school spins this out forever even with children who are really pretty good readers (gold band and above for example) by the end of reception.  So they are learning to read words using more complex code without having been taught the more complex code.

    Posted
    Please Log in or Join this group to replyReply
  • post reply

    Perhaps we could take a leaf from the Finnish experience because they don't have three things which we very definitely do have. They don't have (1) a government policy on the teaching of reading and they don't have (2) synthetic phonics and they don't have (3) illiteracy.

    Posted
    Please Log in or Join this group to replyReply