KS2 reading SAT 2012

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KS2 reading SAT 2012

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    Quite an interesting topic this year, but some tricky questions that I had to read more than once! Still beats 'Caves' Any ideas/predictions about tomorrow's writing?
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     I thought it seemed a very long paper- a lot of my class struggled to get anywhere near the end of it. How did other schools find it?

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    I thought some of the questions were very very tricky - my class came out of it completely demoralised! Caves seemed a breeze compared to this one. Also might I add a morbid topic - reading and answering questions on death!

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    Why don't we start another thread about the reading first.
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    Mine loved reading it but really struggled with the questions - very long and complex I thought. I also thought it was very sneaky putting lots of tick box tables on the last 2 pages - lots of mine got bogged down in the middle and nearly missed the easier marks at the end - I hate it when the design of a paper could have such an influence on your outcome.
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    I feel more at ease now I can see other schools found the paper just as hard. Even my tops struggled to finish the test
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    I also think it favoured boys and children from middle class homes.
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    mlloves
    I also think it favoured boys and children from middle class homes.
    Because they are more likely to get the plague?
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    I thought it was trickier than the caving one for sure! Even the one pointer circle the answer questions were too tricky! Thing is, if we all found it tough, the bench Mark will be lower.... Hopefully!
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    Personally, I thought it was an improvement on caving, but I agree there were some tricky questions. I wonder how many children were confused about the two questions on the use of the word 'cool' referring to the dress in the story?

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    As I say, they follow a theme. So possibly a description of the plagued London or perhaps a personal account of the situation. Also, why were the circle questions tricky? Were the options very similar?
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    Milgod
    mlloves
    I also think it favoured boys and children from middle class homes.
    Because they are more likely to get the plague?

     

    because they are more likely to have the general knowledge that makes this a more familiar topic, and be less thrown by the vocabulary (who uses the word 'tobacco' these days?) also - haven't got the paper in front of me, so corrrect me please if wrong - but didn't the question wrt tobacco expect general knowledge rather than analysis of the text?

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    florapost

    Milgod
    mlloves
    I also think it favoured boys and children from middle class homes.
    Because they are more likely to get the plague?

     

    because they are more likely to have the general knowledge that makes this a more familiar topic, and be less thrown by the vocabulary (who uses the word 'tobacco' these days?) also - haven't got the paper in front of me, so corrrect me please if wrong - but didn't the question wrt tobacco expect general knowledge rather than analysis of the text?

    Oh my lord. There is really no pleasing some people. Last year people complained that inner city schools wouldn't be able to get into the idea of caving as they would never have done it (like most children obviously have who live outside of cities). Now, there is a topic that many schools (both inner city and leafy village) will have actually studied a part of and that still isn't good enough.

     

    I'm actually mad that London based children are at an advantage as the story was set in London. Many of my class haven't been to London, so had no idea what was going on.

     

    There were words used that were 'old fashioned', that was the bloomin idea! I would say (factual evidence made up in my head) that inner city children would be more likely to come from homes with smoking parents. Thus, they would have more chance of knowing about tobacco than those outside of the cities.

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    Milgod
    Now, there is a topic that many schools (both inner city and leafy village) will have actually studied a part of and that still isn't good enough.

    yeah - i wondered about that too - some will have studied it, some won't - we used to, but haven't for some years - which puts non-studiers at a (hidden) disadvantage.

    but if you are from a school that hasn't studied the plague, you are more likely to be familiar with it if you are widely read and/or get taken out to museums

    wherever you live

    or are the children at your school so absolutely rural that they are museum-deprived?

    and i still query the word 'tobacco' - i think we can take it as a fact that the working classes smoke more, but i haven't heard the actual word outside of beatrix potter for years

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    I don't work in a rural school, but I can't stand the idea that apparently inner city children can't possibly read a book. Most of the children I know from village schools play just as much XBOX as everyone else.

     

    What type of topic would be good for inner city children?

     

    Recent topics -

    - Caving - no chance for them to do it

    - Gold - greek myth, not suitable for inner cities (too high brow)

    - Volanoes - Inner city children wouldn't read about that and wouldn't go on holiday to Italy

    - Tree house - no trees in inner cities

    - Heartbeat - inner city children aren't allowed to have music lessons.

     

     

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    I too thought it was a long paper and the subject matter was difficult for second language children (that's the majority of ours)

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    Milgod --- I agree with you, we can't pander to everyone's needs requirements and experience! We have read stories about aliens but non of my inner city, EAL pupils have every experienced an alien in first person, we have read stories about princes and princesses, digging in Africa, magic carpet rides, fossils, whaling, knights of the relm and vivisection!!!! All way beyond their first hand experience.......I thought the font was a little small thats my biggest bug bear as the font even on books aimed at Level 5 usually isn't that small and that has a big psychological effect no matter what your reading or who you are!!
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    Middle class children (not necessarily rural) are generally exposed the the higher level vocabulary that was used in the text.  For example, my children don't often use the words, 'apprehension, disconcerted, odious, perplexed, prevention, highly valued, domestic, situation, ill conception or remembrance'  Middle class children maybe more likely to be taken to museums or  listen to/watch historical narratives (e.g. Bleak House) and watch documentaries.  I don't know of any schools that have taught about the plague for years  Whereas the writing tasks were superb. Really relevant to the children in my class.
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    mlloves
    Middle class children (not necessarily rural) are generally exposed the the higher level vocabulary that was used in the text.  For example, my children don't often use the words, 'apprehension, disconcerted, odious, perplexed, prevention, highly valued, domestic, situation, ill conception or remembrance'  Middle class children maybe more likely to be taken to museums or  listen to/watch historical narratives (e.g. Bleak House) and watch documentaries.  I don't know of any schools that have taught about the plague for years  Whereas the writing tasks were superb. Really relevant to the children in my class.

    Are you mental? How many children (or their parents) - middle, upper, lower or royal - use those words.

    Some of those I didn't highlight are not beyond inner city children. If they are then maybe the teachers need to do more vocabulary work.

    Bleak House?! I don't think I'll say anymore on that.

    Some of you have some wierd ideas of what 'middle class' children get up to. If you don't think they spend most of their spare time on XBOX live (mainly boys) or using the word 'like' 14 times in a sentence, then you are a bit out of touch.

    IMO (best addthat , before people get touchy)

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    Hmmm...me think some people maybe trolling here.
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