Current Issues in Teaching

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TES Prospective teachers - Forum

Whether you’re a career changer, thinking about starting a BEd or you’re planning on taking the PGCE route you’ll find lots of advice here. Charlie Taylor will answer new topics containing "Dear Charlie" in the subject.

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Current Issues in Teaching

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    I

    have
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    I have an interview at leeds and i was wondering if anybody could give me a few pointers on the current major issues in teaching? This would be really helpfull just to know im on the right track, im doing business studies if this helps.

     

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    The main things I've noticed are the move towards inclusion (aiming to give every child a place within a mainstream school) and the related issues with reducing permanent exclusions, plus ongoing controversies regarding the usefulness or otherwise of governmental targets, SATs etc. 

     Smaller things that there are a bit of a "buzz" about are the move towards Restorative Justice in schools as opposed to traditional discipline, the ongoing difficulties of balancing the curriculum (as no-one wants either for children to miss out on critical maths, english and ICT skills nor for them to miss out on personal growth experiences of a broader curriculum), and the conflict between paper resources and digital resources (there was recently an article on this in the TES - "broken spines"?).

    You don't say if you are going for a primary or secondary PGCE. In either case, but especially for primary, you might want to look at the Cambridge review that just came out.

     

    I wouldn't think you'd need to know about all of these in great detail - but controversies on pay and conditions are probably not the best thing to bring up at the interview!

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    Ahem - the 14-19 curriculum is a seriously big issue, which includes the gradual introduction of the new diplomas (a veritable hornet's nest of issues in itself).

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    Isnt the recent Cambridge Review on primary education which has taken 3 years to do quiet a big issue?

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    thanks for all that info erinj that has given me some good starting points to look at!!

     

    Middlemarch, i have considered the 14-19 curriculum might be quite a big issue especially as i am doing a PGCE in business studies which focuses on that age range. Do you know of any good sources of info to find out more about the current issues especially in this area? it would be a real help

     

    Thanks

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    Good, official source of latest education issues is [www.teachernet.gov.uk]

    Use the search function to locate required information.

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    As well as inclusion of SEN children it is important to consider implications of having an EAL child who may not speak any english. Just a thought, good luck with the interview!
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    Please do not use the phrase 'SEN children' and 'EAL child', as they are seen as stereotyping and labelling. Refer to them always as 'children with SEN' and 'a child with EAL'.

    Also do not discuss SEN and EAL in the same sentence. A child with EAL has no SEN per se. He or she may indeed be a high flyer, in their own language, and all they may need is suitable adaptation to realise their potential.

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    This is a bit pedantic.
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    This thread is 3 years old however it may seem pedantic but language used does make a huge difference! And comes hand in hand with the movement away from the medical model of disability to a social model. I work with adults with learning disabilities and mental health issues and in terms of peoples perception of them and their view of themselves calling them learning disabled or mentally ill people implies that that is all they are but their learning disabilities are only a small part of who they are not how they should be defined. You'd be surprised how many people still think people with learning disabilities should be locked away and it's up to us who have other views to try and change this any way we can even if it comes down to something seemingly small as language used.
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